Apartment plants

The Bromeliads

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The bromeliads

Bromeliads are plants of tropical origin, there are hundreds of species, many of which are widespread in cultivation as houseplants, since they are very decorative, and often are well suited to being grown indoors. All bromeliads produce dense rosettes of fleshy and rigid leaves, leathery, ribbon-shaped, arched, often with a sharp apex; some species have foliage covered with a thin layer of bloom, which makes them grayish in color. Among the leaves they produce various kinds of inflorescences, round and flattened, or elongated and thin, panicle, fan; the inflorescences are often subtended by numerous brightly colored papyrus bracts and produce many small white or lilac flowers. The bromeliads they produce a small root system, therefore they are often grown in very small containers; they do not have many cultivation needs, even if to obtain always luxuriant leaves and a new inflorescence it is necessary to follow some simple precautions, otherwise our bromeliad is destined to wither slowly.


How they are grown

The bromeliads they originate in South America, where they live in the most varied places, in the rain forests, in the deserts, in the Andean mountainous areas; there are therefore different types of bromeliads, with the most disparate cultivation needs. The botanical varieties originating from the rain forests, or hybrids of the latter, are generally grown in the apartment, and therefore the varieties of tillandsia, vriesea, billbergia or water that we find in the nursery have more or less similar cultivation needs. These plants have adapted to drawing the water they need to live directly from rainfall, rather than using their roots, and in fact they produce a decidedly reduced root system; in nature these plants collect the water from the rains, storing it in the cup that is formed in the center of the rosette of leaves. So when we water our bromeliad it is advisable to fill the rosette with leaves, rather than wetting the soil; this is because generally these plants need a good environmental humidity, but they don't like water stagnations, which quickly ruin the roots, and subsequently the whole plant. In addition to watering the plants in this way, every day we vaporize the foliage with demineralized water, especially in summer, and in periods when the heating or air conditioning is switched on in the house, which tend to excessively dry the air.

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